Dalton L

Dalton L is a film critic/essayist. He has served on the music jury of MG university, and the film jury of ALIIFF. And is on the board of advisors of an international film festival. He has co-authored a book on cinema, and is presently co-authoring another. He started his journalistic career writing for The Hindu. A few months later, he was offered the post of associate editor of India’s #1 music magazine. Following that, he covered music shows and reviewed music for the Times of India group. He reviewed Hollywood films for The Film Street Journal, and Malayalam films for Upperstall and the Deccan Chronicle. In addition to being a writer, he is also a prolific cameraman with around ten years of experience as a documenter of reality, and has briefly captured in moving images a variety of performers ranging from Pt. Jasraj and Trilok Gurtu to America, Shaggy, Enrique Iglesias, Jethro Tull, Uriah Heap, and Dire Straits. He regularly screens good cinema, and encourages upcoming filmmakers. He is presently setting up a film studio, House of Illusions, and shooting five cinematic essays. He is on the verge too of editing-publishing a film magazine—Illusions.
  • City of God

    Mainstream Indian filmmakers are generally “inspired” by the premises and plots of foreign-language films. Lijo Pellissery doesn’t flick any story; he just tries, very hard and unsuccessfully, to replicate the stylization and treatment of the original City of God. Handheld cameras are used throughout. The film opens with a...
  • Celluloid

    Originality is an art that isn’t practiced everywhere. Unfortunately, Malayalam cinema too, as ‘Celluloid’ explicitly suggests, appears to have its roots in what is now a Hollywood classic. Circa 1926, JC Daniel sells a portion of his ancestral land in order to make what would be the first Malayalam...
  • Annayum Rasoolum (Anna and Rasool)

    The neorealist school of filmmaking when it came into existence advocated for a particular reason the use of a deep focus lens: it allowed reality to pervade every micro-inch of the screen. Annayum Rasoolum follows none of the laid-down rules, but strives nevertheless to be real, and only partially...
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