Dalton L

Dalton L is a film critic/essayist. He has served on the music jury of MG university, and the film jury of ALIIFF. And is on the board of advisors of an international film festival. He has co-authored a book on cinema, and is presently co-authoring another. He started his journalistic career writing for The Hindu. A few months later, he was offered the post of associate editor of India’s #1 music magazine. Following that, he covered music shows and reviewed music for the Times of India group. He reviewed Hollywood films for The Film Street Journal, and Malayalam films for Upperstall and the Deccan Chronicle. In addition to being a writer, he is also a prolific cameraman with around ten years of experience as a documenter of reality, and has briefly captured in moving images a variety of performers ranging from Pt. Jasraj and Trilok Gurtu to America, Shaggy, Enrique Iglesias, Jethro Tull, Uriah Heap, and Dire Straits. He regularly screens good cinema, and encourages upcoming filmmakers. He is presently setting up a film studio, House of Illusions, and shooting five cinematic essays. He is on the verge too of editing-publishing a film magazine—Illusions.
  • The Book of Eli

    The Book of Eli

    It took Moses forty years to cross the desert. When The Book of Eli opens, Eli (Denzel Washington) has already spent thirty years walking towards his chosen destination, quite appropriately, the West. His is a character much like that of an angel from the older of the two Testaments;...
  • Captivity

    Captivity

    Some films, such as Captivity, are made for a singular, shocking purpose: to capitalize on a sick audience’s thirst for sensationalism and the gross spectacle of human blood and gore. They also reveal, as in this case, the deteriorated condition of its maker’s mind. The filmmaker, decaying in the...
  • The reader

    The Reader

    Circumstances and the prevailing laws of society can radically change ordinary people and compel them to commit atrocities. The Reader, produced by Anthony Minghella and Sydney Pollack (who both passed away prior to the film’s release), is a fictional case study. When a serious film opens with an extreme...
  • Modern Times

    Modern Times

    A clock with the seconds-needle soundlessly completes a circle and a half around it, setting the opening tone for Chaplin’s satirical “story of industry, of individual enterprise – humanity crusading in the pursuit of happiness”: Modern Times, inhabited in the Depression years by the famished populace, jobless or underpaid...
  • The Happening

    The Happening

    The majority of poor M. Night Shyamalan’s detractors probably anticipate from his films something on par with his debut feature, and therefore, always end up being a little disappointed. This is a pity, for his films aren’t all that awful. In fact, if they were to watch The Happening...
  • Rani Padmini

    Rani Padmini

    Of the urge to break free   There comes a time in every girl’s imagination when what she’d want above all is to throw a few things in a bag and hit the road all by herself. Now, this may not sound like the sanest thing to do, but...
  • Pathemari

    Pathemari

    Homage to the stoic toilers in the Gulf   Most every Malayali has had a whiff of the highly-perfumed Gulf-returnee or at least has heard tales of it. Pathemari presents a glimpse of the other side: the hardships and mental struggles of those who went to make something for...
  • Ennu Ninte Moideen

    Ennu Ninte Moideen

    Perfectionism can be quite a nice trait to possess; except that it runs the danger of being a little expensive. Especially in filmmaking, an art form in which time is money and paying attention to a wide range of details is a requisite. Ennu Ninte Moideen (Yours, Moideen), reportedly,...
  • Double Barrel

    Filmmaking, in its finest form, is an art that employs visuals to tell a story. ‘Double Barrel’ is a visual extravaganza with no story at all to tell. It is simply bold and experimental, and, like the director’s ‘City of God’, is high on stylization steroids. The scenes are...
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