MK Raghavendra

MK Raghavendra is a Bengaluru-based film/literary scholar, theorist, critic and writer who had, till 2016, authored six volumes on cinema, and contributed to numerous newspapers and periodicals in India and outside. He received the Swarna Kamal, the National Award for Best Film Critic in 1997. He is the co-founder of the film journal ‘Deep Focus’; the founder-editor of ‘Phalanx’, an online journal dedicated to debate; and a member of both FCCI and FIPRESCI. He has been a member of the jury for various international film festivals as well as for the Indian Panorama (twice) by the government of India.
  • The Monk

    The Monk

    Dominik Moll has not been prolific, The Monk (2011) being only his fourth feature film. But on the strength of the three films widely seen, there is little doubt that he is one of the most inventive of filmmakers and among the greatest storytellers to have come out of...
  • Lincoln

    Lincoln

    There are numerous ways in which a biopic of a statesman or a politician can be put together in cinema and the chosen approach depends, partly, on the reverence with which the person is regarded by the public likely to watch the film. When a statesman is as well-regarded...
  • Melancholia

    Melancholia

    Lars von Trier has zeroed in on Andrei Tarkovsky as the greatest filmmaker of all times and, judging from his pronouncements, he is regarding himself as Tarkovsky’s successor. Tarkovsky was a great filmmaker but if Lars von Trier’s Melancholia bears a resemblance to any of Tarkovsky’s works, it is...
  • Amour

    Amour

    Amour (meaning ‘Love’) stars Jean-Louis Trintignant, Emmanuelle Riva and Isabelle Huppert. The narrative focuses on an elderly couple, Anne and Georges, who are retired music teachers with a daughter who lives abroad. The opening scene shows firemen breaking down the door of an apartment in Paris to find the...
  • Les Enfants du Paradis

    Les Enfants Du Paradis

    Widely regarded as the greatest film ever made, Marcel Carne’s Les Enfants Du Paradis (1945) is not as well known in India where that other contender for the ‘greatest film’ – Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane (1941) – still rules, except perhaps among Francophiles. Les Enfants Du Paradis is set among actors and performers...
  • Iss. IX

    Cosmopolis

    David Cronenberg is the greatest filmmaker in the English-speaking world, who has been continuing to make provocative and deeply thoughtful films when other claimants to the title like David Lynch, Atom Egoyan and Quentin Tarantino have been in decline. Several factors come to Cronenberg’s assistance and one is his ability...
  • Certified Copy

    Certified Copy

    Abbas Kiarostami is the best known of Iranian filmmakers and it will not be out of place to assert that he put Iranian cinema on the world map. Yet, a careful viewing of his films raises questions about the validity of his methods. To put is plainly, Kiarostami’s best...
  • Iss. VI - The Long Goodbye

    The Long Goodbye

    Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye (1973) – based on a novel of the same name by Raymond Chandler – belongs to a genre called the ‘hard-boiled detective story’, which may be regarded as a sub-category under noir and includes films like Huston’s The Maltese Falcon (1941) and Polanski’s Chinatown (1974). The genre has been accorded recognition as...
  • Arbitrage

    Arbitrage

    Nicholas Jarecki’s Arbitrage is a political film, but its statement is disguised as family drama. The first factor that makes it highly political is that it is about a hedge-fund tycoon and investment bankers have become highly controversial after the subprime mortgage crisis of 2008, as a result of...